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June 24, 2022

$100 to Seven Figures with Robyn Johnson

$100 to Seven Figures with Robyn Johnson

This episode features Robyn Johnson, the CEO of Marketplace Blueprint. She is one of the country’s foremost leaders in selling and marketing products on Amazon.com. She initially started her business with $100 at a garage sale and built it to $1M in just a few years.

Learn more about Robyn’s ecommerce story and what she thinks about the opportunity for new Amazon sellers compare to when she began.

Discover why Robyn thinks it is better to sell on Amazon instead of growing your own website and the quickest ways to grow your ecommerce business on Amazon in 2022. Find out how she sees a significant increase in velocity in terms of FBA Fulfillment by Amazon.

Robyn also shares the tools that she uses to determine the profitability of selling on Amazon.

Find out more on the type of products she has seen having the most success on Amazon and her one piece of actionable advice for people who are just starting to sell their products on Amazon.

Episode Action Items:

To find more information about Robyn’s company, go to marketplaceblueprint.com

 

ABOUT THE HOST:

Andy Splichal - Make Each Click Count PodcastAndy Splichal is the World's Foremost Expert on Ecommerce Growth Strategies. He is the acclaimed author of the Make Each Click Count Book Series, the Founder & Managing Partner of True Online Presence and the Founder of Make Each Click Count University. Andy was named to The Best of Los Angeles Award's Most Fascinating 100 List in both 2020 and 2021.

New episodes of the Make Each Click Count Podcast, are released each Friday and can be found on Apple Podcast, iHeart Radio, iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, Amazon Music, Google Podcasts and www.makeeachclickcount.com.

Transcript

Andy Splichal 0:02

Welcome to the Make Each Click Count podcast. This is your host, Andy Splichal. We are happy to welcome this week's guest to discuss today's topic, which is From $100 to Seven Figures. This week's guest is one of the country's foremost leaders in selling and marketing products on amazon.com. She has appeared on Entrepreneur on Fire, The Search Engine Journal and many other podcasts and publications. She initially started her business with $100 at a garage sale and built it into $1 million in sales in just a few years. A big hello to Robyn Johnson. Hi, Robyn.

 

Robyn Johnson 1:21

Hi, thank you so much for having me. I always love getting to share. So I appreciate the invitation.

 

Andy Splichal 1:27

Well, we're excited to have have you on the show. Now let's get right to probably the most burning questions, question that listeners have after that intro, which is what was the product that you purchased at the garage sale? And were there any more of them?

 

Robyn Johnson 1:43

Well, I wish it was just one you know, but it was, you know it at the risk of revealing the man behind the curtain, you know really was a lot of lead a lot of hard work and grit, that kind of you know, we started buying things. I had a less less than a six month old and a toddler with me at the time. And so I was buying a lot of used baby stuff, cleaned it up and then reselling it on Craigslist and eBay. And then I started buying things retail. So I would go into just regular retail stores and find things and flip them on Amazon and eBay started to do actually even a lot with like Disney and things along those lines along and then we started buying things wholesale. And that's when we realized that Amazon was a really big problem for brands. And about five, six years ago, we started an agency. And so now we you know, we went from kind of like cleaning dirty things up in garage sales to now working with, you know, publicly traded and shark tank size companies that that to help them market their products on Amazon. So it's been a fun and crazy journey.

 

Andy Splichal 2:54

So how long ago did your Ecommerce story began? And do you think the opportunity for new Amazon sellers is better or worse today than when you when you started?

 

Robyn Johnson 3:06

So I started it was about 12 years ago. And the opportunity is just different. So it was the wild wild west anything goes and there's still lots of opportunity and Ecommerce that is like that, Amazon has started to grow up as a platform. And so some of the things that we got away with when you know, 10 years ago wouldn't fly on Amazon today. But there's also a lot of tools and a lot of resources that we didn't have when we started selling on Amazon. So you know, there's still lots of opportunity on Amazon is just making sure that you are really thinking about the platform and where it is today. And kind of looking at how you want to approach the potential opportunities that you have to kind of make your mark and ecommerce and on Amazon right now.

 

Andy Splichal 3:54

So if I was going to launch a new ecommerce business, why sell on Amazon instead of concentrating on growing growing your own website?

 

Robyn Johnson 4:06

So this is a great question. And it really asked the question to answer that question of whether or not it's a good idea is always going to be a depends which is kind of like the marketing catch all. But you know, when when it works out to be better on Amazon, there's a couple reasons. One is the Amazon already has a lot of captured buyers. So if you have a product that's already in demand on Amazon, and especially if this that products already in demand on Amazon, but there's not a lot of people offering that particular product, maybe you've made a better mousetrap and so you know that you can capture that audience. Amazon is,their advertising is very bottom of funnel. When you're looking at a marketing funnel, we think of the top funnel as awareness kind of bringing people into market. And when people get to Amazon, they're ready to buy. So you have a shorter sales sequence so it's easier to get sales quickly. You don't have to worry about well, what was it my site or wasn't my ads? You You know, Amazon has kind of this proven platform for you to kind of launch your product on. And a lot of the things that a lot of the variables that can come into play with E commerce, you know, CRO, you know, indexing, in plumbing, for your Facebook ads, all of that is really taken out of the equation, and you can really focus on having a great product, and focusing on selling it. Now, if you have a commoditized item, it's much more difficult on Amazon to launch commoditized items. So if you want to just put your, your brand name sticker on a garlic press or a yoga mat, that's a lot more difficult than it was five or six years ago, and it's still 100% possible, you just have to have really deep pockets. So you know, if you but if you're bringing, if you have a product that you're bringing to the market that solves a problem, or you're working with a company that has that and has a search volume, there's still lots of great reasons to start on Amazon. And there are already seasoned buyers. So kind of like you can make it in New York, you can make it anywhere. If you can sell your product on Amazon, it can really provide great proof of concept as you go to try to get that shelf space in retail. And it can help you kind of build up that confidence before you ramp up those spins on other platforms.

 

Andy Splichal 6:18

So if you decide to go ahead and you want to launch your products on Amazon, what are some of the quickest ways to grow your ecommerce business on Amazon in 2022.

 

Robyn Johnson 6:30

For the most part, you're going to need to use Amazon's Fulfillment by Amazon program, which means that you're gonna need to get that means that's how you get that prime badge that everybody wants. So customers have been trained to kind of expect that prime badge. So unless you're in a space where nobody else is offering a prime offer, you're really going to need to do that, then you're going to want to use Amazon has some special things for brands that can help different advertising and listing optimization pieces that are part of their brand registry program. And so you can utilize those things. And then Amazon has a really great added program. And it's great for beginners, because you don't have to worry about a lot of creative, the creative is primarily taken out of your listing. And so it can really make things a good place for people to start. Amazon ads are very different than Google though. So if you come from a Google background, make sure you really understand there's a lot of things that look like they should behave like Google, but they behave very differently, you know, even just kind of down to like how optimization works on Amazon, on Amazon, Google SEO and the SEM or the pay per click ad. Advertising is tied together. They're interlinked. And so one works with the other, which is very different from, you know, traditional DTC or Google Marketing, Facebook marketing, where you know, running ads doesn't necessarily impact organic rank on Amazon, it does. And so it needs to be part of a cohesive strategy.

 

Andy Splichal 7:57

So you had mentioned FBA Fulfillment by Amazon, for those that might have never been involved in selling their products on Amazon, can you? Can you describe what that is? And why? Or I guess how much how important is it compared to fulfilling orders yourself.

 

Robyn Johnson 8:14

So we've had products that were selling well on Amazon, so they were getting consistent sales. So it's not like we took something that wasn't performing something that was performing fairly well. It is predictable to get at least a 300% increase in velocity. Now, it doesn't happen every time. But most of the times, you're gonna see a significant increase in how many products you sell, when you go from shipping that product yourself to having Amazon ship that product for you.

 

Andy Splichal 8:40

So I'm sorry, on average, 300% increase?

 

Robyn Johnson 8:43

Yes, in sales velocity. I know that seems like a crazy number. But it it makes a huge difference for Amazon buyers, it is, you know, the equivalent of having like next day shipping versus having like it might get to you in three weeks. So it makes a giant difference. And the way that it works is you take a couple of cases or you take as little as one item, and you send it into Amazon's fulfillment warehouse. When the item sells Amazon will be in charge of shipping that particular item to the customer that Amazon FBA fee is going to include the box that it sends things in the the postage to the customer, the labor of putting the item in the box, and any customer service that is related to and oftentimes it's going to be cheaper than what you can send that product to Amazon for yourself. So there's always going to be a percentage based off of the category and your total final offer the total value of your product. So that's gonna range that that feed is whether you sell ship it yourself or use FBA that that referral fee is going to be eight to 20% of the total cost of the product. Depending on what category you're in most categories is going to be 15 to 20%. So what we're going to look at there is then then the FBA fee is the things that are just related to FBA. So if you had an item that was 12 inches by 10 inches by one inches, the FBA fee for that would be it was about a half a pound would probably be right around $4.52. That includes the they put the they met, they mail it to the customer, the packaging, the pick and pack. And if the customer wants to return it handling the customer service, that's you know, cheaper than you know, you might get on a retail price for to ship those items yourself. And it makes a huge difference. Because you get to have this like built in trust that Amazon has built with its customers.

 

What would you say to the merchant selling stuff on Amazon that says, Fulfillment by Amazon is too expensive, I'm just going to, I'll sell it on Amazon, but I'm going to fulfill it myself.

 

So if you have something that is life changing, and nobody else is offering it, you know, so or, you know, there are some things that they're not a lot of FBA offers. So if you're selling, you know, couches, there's not a lot of FBA couches, you know, so then it's not a big of a deal, I would say continue doing what you're doing. If it's something where your competitors are all doing FBA, you are only capturing capturing a fraction of a fraction, and your ads are going to be much more expensive. Everything is going to you're not not going to get economies of scale. So while it might make sense to keep that product on Amazon, and you might get incremental sales, if you're not going to use FBA, for 80 to 90% of the products, I would say, you know, don't put a lot of effort into the channel, if you're not going to consider using FBA or some sort of offer this program is going to get that prime batch. Of course, there are always exceptions. But out you know, if if you don't hit one of those exceptions, where maybe it's you know, wildly expensive, you know, you have very small, very, very expensive items, I would say look at the you know, the shrinkage that you're gonna get in retail stores, look at kind of the frustrations that you have kind of in every channel, and then you know, build some of those that extra cost to the customer, you might find on Amazon, we find that there's a lot of price elasticity. So maybe in retail stores, you're at 19.99 to kind of cover that FBA class, maybe you make it 24.99 on Amazon. Now, Amazon will scan Walmart, Target, Lowe's, and if they see that there's a price lower than they will kind of make it more difficult for customers to buy your product on Amazon. But you know,

 

Andy Splichal:

Do they tell you that they're doing that or no?

 

Robyn Johnson:

They do they send you a brand Health Alert, which tells you doesn't really tell you much. They basically say we found your product less expensive, you should lower your price, but they won't tell you where. So then you have to go to Google and say, Okay, who's selling my product at 24.96. And then from there, you can determine whether or not you're going to try to get that particular vendor to increase the price, or if you're going to try to come down to match the price. So I just want to say from the outset that Amazon is frustrating, they provide me as a service provider that you know, basically handles trying to make Amazon less frustrating for brands, Amazon provides me a lot of job security. So if you're feeling like Amazon is frustrating, is not you. It is a very particular marketplace. And it does have a steep learning curve. And so if you're feeling that know that it's not just you. But you know, even if we had a publicly traded company, very large, several agencies that already been working on it, but we took it over. And by just fixing some of the offers adjusting some of the listings, we were enabled for two years in a row to have over 100% year over year growth. And they already had significant volume. The volume and top line revenue increase was enough where it netted them a $40 million investment where they got 40 million net to their company in investment, because of the top line revenue growth you're able to achieve on Amazon. So there is a lot of of product opera, a lot of sales opportunities, even for established products. And for young products. It's one of the few places where you're not going to get charged more versus Procter and Gamble to get that that spot everybody gets has the same opportunities. You know that to put your product on Amazon so you get to compete head to head without the advantages that some of the bigger manufacturers have on other platforms. So there's a lot of opportunity that goes with that frustration as I guess what I'm saying.

 

Andy Splichal:

Are there any tools that you use to determine profitability on selling on Amazon, whether it's how much your fees would be if it's fulfilled by Amazon or fulfilled by merchant or storage fees or this fee or that, I mean, there's so many tools that you use as an agency.

 

Robyn Johnson:

Yeah, so I mean, Amazon provides a really great one called the FBA revenue calculator. So if you Google FBA revenue calculator, you can type in your product. And you can put in your product dimensions, and it will tell you how much your fees are going to be in, it even includes kind of a little monthly storage fee. You know, storage fees tend to be pretty negligible unless you have a, you know, big and light item, or big and heavy item. So you know, it as long as you're managing the storage, they don't tend to be that often you really want to manage for between three to six weeks of of inventory at Amazon, keeping that sweet spot.

 

Andy Splichal:

How does it work for products with an expiration date?

 

Robyn Johnson:

So with expiration dates used to be very simple, it's gotten a little bit more complicated. You know, if you have a basically you need to have 90 days of time left on there, there's a very detailed expiration date policy. And it's, you know, it's there, you have to have this window. But if you have a product that you only use one a day, and there's 180 tablets in there, then for that product, you would need 180 days. And like I said, I know that that's frustrating. But when you're approaching Amazon, you want to kind of put yourself in the mindset of, I want to make sure that customers are really, really happy. If you come from that mindset, all of the Amazon policies start to make more sense, not all of them, they start to make more sense that there's still things that are frustrating, but at least helps you get there. If you haven't read the 14 guiding principles of Amazon, it really helps you understand the frame of mind that the people creating these policies have, and it can really help you understand their perspective, and why they might do some of the things that they do.

 

Andy Splichal:

What type of products have you seen in the last year or two having the most success on Amazon?

 

Robyn Johnson:

So, right now, the things that I do the best are the things that are they provide some sort of value. So a lot of them, you know, for six years ago, it was all about bringing garlic presses and yoga mats and cell phone cases. Those things are very difficult. In fact, we have a lot of friends that also have agencies, most of the agencies won't even take supplements, they don't want to take supplement products on Amazon, because it's just the competition is so stiff. But if you have something that's a little bit more niche has something that's a unique selling property, I'm going to kind of give you a what we look for in an agency is one, if a brand already has people searching for on Amazon, we use several tools to help us to identify whether that brand has already been searched for on Amazon, that tells us this product is going to have a much easier launch. The other thing we look at is how much competition versus how much search volume there is. So there's a lot of search volume for cell phone, keys, iPhone cell phone case, but there's also a lot of competition. So we're kind of looking for, for better for lack of a better word, like a golden gap, where maybe your unique selling proposition makes sure is a better option. Or there's some sort of niche where where we can say like customers are going to type in this keyword. And there's not a lot of solutions. And your product is a really good solution for that for that search term. And so we're going to kind of market it that way. So that's really what we're looking for on Amazon as an agency when we're looking at for clients, we only take clients that we think that we can make a difference for. So when we're looking at potential clients, that's really what we're looking for, we're looking for some unique selling proposition that makes us different, that gives us a unique marketing opportunity. A gap where there is search volume, but not a lot of competition, or branded search already for there for that particular product. And we use several tools, I'm going to give you the names of some of my favorites. And you know, so merchant words is got some really great tools

 

Andy Splichal:

Merchant words?

 

Robyn Johnson:

merchantwords.com Yeah, they're great. Helium 10 is kind of a industry standard. And then sell zone is if you already trust the brand, SEMrush. Then SEMrush now has a suite of Amazon tools sets from the under the name sell zone. So those are three tools that if you're looking to kind of play around with Amazon, you want to get an idea of the you know, the search volume, the competition. Those are three of the kind of like my favorite places to look at when it gets started.

 

Andy Splichal:

Now most brands don't have the same level of success as you have had selling on Amazon. Where do you find that most of the mistakes are occurring? And how can they improve?

 

Robyn Johnson:

So if you come from a Google back, so when I talk to people about Amazon, did you ever watch Disney's version of Alice in Wonderland?

 

Andy Splichal:

I don't think so? Was that with Johnny Depp? I don't think so.

 

Robyn Johnson:

Well, like the cartoon, you know, it's a little with a little white rabbit.

 

Andy Splichal:

I'm not sure.

 

Robyn Johnson:

Well, if you did watch it, there was you know, she falls down this hole and everything looks the same. You know, she sees some flowers, and all of a sudden the flowers talk, she sees some butterflies, but they're not really butterflies, they're bred and butterflies, Amazon compared to the rest of E digital comm. Digital marketing is very much like that, it looks the same, but it behaves differently. So that's usually where we see the majority of people making their mistakes. They're trying to figure out how to do schema and technical SEO, or they're trying to figure out how they can apply this particular digital marketing technique onto Amazon. Amazon has its own marketplace, the search bar looks the same. If you type something in you hit search, but it behaves very, very differently than Google. And the ads are very different than Facebook ads. And you know, you have to think about the intent of the user. If you've gone to any search, or some, you know, conferences, you will have heard the phrase in buyer intent of the people that are on that search engine or on that platform, what is their intent on Amazon, people are already there to buy. So the words, the way that we market, the things that we're considering are very different on that platform. So it really comes from taking the time to understand the unique pieces, that platform, if you come from, Amazon provides some free training. And you can actually even get certified to run their ads for free. And that's through the Amazon learning console. And they really go through their, you know, how the definitions of their match types work, how their bid auctions for advertising works, why store pages, and E plus content make a difference, you can find a lot of great material there that's kept fairly up to date. Whereas a lot of YouTube trainings and I say this, as somebody who post things on YouTube, sometimes they can be very out of date. In general on Amazon, if it is more than six months old, I would not personally recommend that you trust it. Unless there's been an update recently, things just move very, very quickly. So you know, I try to look for respected names in the industry, and in content that is less than six months old.

 

Andy Splichal:

Yeah, those are great tips. I mean, that's very similar to Google. I just. You know, I have three books on Google. And it seems that it's very difficult to keep them up to date. So it's the same kind of same kind of deal there. Hey, um, let's say you had a crystal ball, how would you see selling on Amazon changing for sellers in the next year to 18 months?

 

Robyn Johnson:

So right now, it is, I mean, people are getting crazy evaluations on their brands, you know, like 5, 6, 10 multipliers on you know, like commodity products. You know, it's a big minute, kind of like a white label Renaissance it like people have been making and cashing out times, I think that Amazon is, is maturing as a platform. And you're gonna see, you know, just like Google, did you know you for a while, it was a lot of Blackhat a lot of hack, a lot of like, let me see if I can kind of temporarily figure this out, make my cash and run away. I was seeing kind of that same Mitch Matt, maturing of the platform where we're seeing starting to see those things not work as well. And you're having to go to really more evergreen, traditional digital marketing best practices, understanding customer avatars, having an advertising that makes sense and is well thought out with a strict strategy for different phases of the funnel. So while before, you know, uh, you know, I would say five years ago, it was very much get rich quick was kind of the mentality of a lot of sellers. I think successful sellers over the next five years will be people who are really looking to build a brand, who are really looking to try to reach new potential customers. And you'll see a lot more rich, a more mature digital marketing, a digital marketer that is successful on Amazon, somebody that is really willing to take the time to understand customer journey, like the psychographic needs of their customers, and integrate that into not only their listings, but also their advertising.

 

Andy Splichal:

Now, can you for a few minutes on your journey as an entrepreneur, have there been any business books out there you can attribute to some of your success?

 

Robyn Johnson:

So the one one that I give this a little off from everybody else, there's a Walt Disney biography by Neal Gabler that I love and the reason I love it is because everybody thinks of Walt Disney and the Disney company as this great success. But learning about how many times he nearly lost it all. So times that he failed a really helped me reframe what it was to be successful business person for me. And that gave me the freedom to make the failures that I needed in order to have the wins that I had. So I know that's a little off

 

Andy Splichal:

What's the name of that book. It's it's,

 

Robyn Johnson:

I think it's just Walt Disney is just just the Walt Disney biography. It's about four inches. Let me see if I can pull it up real quick here. It's a Walt Disney the triumph of an American of the American dream or something like that. Walt Disney the triumph of the American imagination by Neal Gabler and I also love Mike Michalowiks you know, Profit First Clockwork and I would say probably Pumpkin Plan are also have really, really helped us. And then Think and Grow Rich by for women. Especially if you're a woman, that last chapter that Sharon Lechter has. I mean, everybody loves good Rich Dad Poor Dad. So she co wrote Rich Dad, Poor Dad with Robert Kiyosaki. And so I really love some of the things that she has done as well.

 

Andy Splichal:

Do you have a favorite success story of what are your clients who could share?

 

Robyn Johnson:

Oh, we've had so many I'm trying to think of, are you looking for more like underdog wins? Or are you looking more for like, you know, like steady brand? Like, gross?

 

Andy Splichal:

You tell me what's your favorite one?

 

Robyn Johnson:

Um, you know, we have had a couple of clients that have been on Shark Tank. And you would think that once you're on Shark Tank, you're kind of you've kind of had it made.

 

Andy Splichal:

So there are brands that have partnered with one of the people on Shark Tank or have just been on it?

 

Robyn Johnson:

They've been on it, we have a couple that have gotten deals, a couple that have gotten deals, and then the deal didn't close on the back end. So they got a deal on the show. But that deal didn't finish. And I think for them, I think I kind of liked them more, because the not as people I love you all all my clients who feel this thing. But I think that it's kind of fun when they didn't get a deal, or the deal didn't go through for one reason or another. Because you know, they had this big high and then you know, this low thing, maybe not working the way that they had intentionally expected them to go. And, you know, for several of our brands, we were able to get them on Amazon, we're able to have them have that significant growth. And that growth has then led them to be able to get into more brick and mortar stores or get better shelf space at brick and mortar. They've taken the data from Amazon and brought it to Bentonville with them when they went to Walmart and been like, Okay, this is how this product converts. This is this is the kind of growth that we've been able to see. And that's been able to help get them to the next piece. So, you know, it's always I love what I do, because I get to be part of this entrepreneurial journey for a lot of, you know, medium sized small, medium sized businesses. But also because I you know, I get to be like, Oh, well, you know, we got to be a part of them hiring somebody else, or them being able to really like actually take the vacation that they wanted to take after they were on Shark Tank, you know, and so helping them grow. We've seen a lot of brands been able to not only capture the market share from their own branded search, but also to really use Amazon as a way to bring new people into their brand and help brand awareness create like new brand affinity within that and then that just it can, it can manifest in other ways where it gives them access to deals they might not have had. And it helps them build the capital to maybe start to build some of the more, you know, traditional DTC funnels and websites as they grow.

 

Andy Splichal:

What problems is your agency solving for their clients? And how are you standing out from your competition?

 

Robyn Johnson:

So with basically what we do is when somebody you know, maybe a brand wants to sell on Amazon, the company doesn't have maybe, maybe Suzy is in charge of Ecommerce. But that means the website, that means maybe social media ad ad buying, she's, she's already pretty, pretty booked out, you know, she doesn't have any more bandwidth. So basically, what we do is we handle all of the Amazon channel, we handle the advertising and the listing, we handle arguing with Amazon, because they charged you the wrong fee, or they removed your product incorrectly. And so we handle all of the frustrations, we do all of the translation of this is why this is important, or why we don't want to go down that path. We already know what programs that you know, would be a good fit and would not be a good fit. And we're part of the Amazon's advertising partner network, which is like an official program that they have for, you know, a small number of agencies. And so we work with our contacts on Amazon, to make sure that they're in any available betas. And so basically, what we do is we take all of the hair pulling, and frustration and stress in Amazon, and we bring it down quite a bit and we say, alright, you need to restock, here's the plan. And we make things nice and clear. A laid out plan that is so there's less frustration less boarded expectations, and more profitability on the channel.

 

Andy Splichal:

Do you offer any services outside of Amazon? Or are you exclusively Amazon?

 

Robyn Johnson:

We do Walmart and eBay and we do other channels outside. So like we would do like my Mercado Libre, which is a great channel if you're trying to expand into Mexico, you don't necessarily need to want want to go into Amazon Mexico, when Mercado Libre, Mercado Libre really has a better presence there. So you know, we can we can do some of those other platforms. In general though, when we have a client that says we want to do some sort of expansion, whether it's off Amazon into WalMart, you know, we we want to make sure that we're not cheapening the brand. By putting it on Walmart, you have targets and option, then we can we can go that way as well. But they're very, their marketplace is very small right now. And invite only. So but we really specialize in marketplaces. And the reason we do that is we do this one thing, we do it really well. And we want to make sure that we're not you're not paying us to learn something new. You're we you're getting kind of the expert level advice. And we focus on this because there's a lot to learn. And there is a lot to keep up to date on. And we feel that by expanding into other things, it would water down our value to the brands that we work with.

 

Andy Splichal:

And how do you charge per your retainer?

 

Robyn Johnson:

So we do a mix of retainer plus percentage of ad spend. And the reason we do that is we've noticed that on agency, sometimes when they do like a percentage of revenue, or overall percentage of avid of ad revenue, then sometimes the goals can be misaligned, we know that you're not going to increase your ad budget unless it's profitable. For us, it's very important not to just focus on top line revenue with brands because we've actually held inventory before, we know it doesn't matter if you're getting a five row as if it's not profitable. So we have to we're willing to keep our interests aligned. And just make sure that as we scale, because we do help companies scale quite significantly, that as we scale your sales on Amazon, that it's still profitable for us to continue servicing the account and make sure you have all the resources that you need. So the retainer is based primarily on the number of skews because as part of the the advertising and account management, we also will do the listing the infographic photos, we can coordinate product photography, all of that we can handle within kind of our umbrella on Amazon.

 

Andy Splichal:

And who is the perfect client for your agency?

 

Robyn Johnson:

Perfect client is somebody that already has product in hand they maybe have already even had some success selling on some channel whether it's you know, maybe you've already maybe you had one Costco order and it went well but you've done some on your site, but you're you're feeling like you want to grow or maybe you were on Shark Tank and you have you've already been done well on your direct to consumer site you're and now you're looking to expand it to other channels before you hit you before you start to hit up the retail store. first. So basically, having a product with some track record doesn't have to be millions and millions but haven't have a, you know that it will sell. And on Amazon, you really do need to advertise now for most products to launch. So you know, at minimum having at least two to $5,000 a month to spend on ads, there are exceptions where sometimes we can even launch a product with no advertising, we usually do an audit up ahead before we close any contracts to make sure that you know exactly what you need. As far as ad spend, time commitment, your resources before you kind of retreat before you have to make a big commitment about working with us. And we don't do a contract, we just do, we do a contract, but you can terminate it with 30 days written notice we only want clients that are overjoyed working with us. And you know, we have really great retention. So that's that's what we're currently offering.

 

Andy Splichal:

And how can an interested listener learn more about working with you?

 

Robyn Johnson:

Yeah, if you go to marketplaceblueprint.com. So marketplaceblueprint.com. And then if you go to forward slash show, if you want to kind of just get a taste before you contacted us, you can there we have a 20 page listing optimization guide. So if you want to, you can, you can opt into that, download that. And then I'm offering like a free mini audits. So you send me one listing, maybe you already have on Amazon, or you send me the kind of product that you have. And I'll send you kind of like a quick five minute video about, you know, what you could do to improve your listing or what the potential market share is on that I can send you a little bit of data. And then if you wanted to do a full audit, or talk about account management, we of course do free consultations. And we can go from there.

 

Andy Splichal:

Now before we wrap it up today, is there one piece of actionable advice that you would give somebody who's just starting to sell their products on Amazon.

 

Robyn Johnson:

When you're looking at Amazon, it's the most capitalist extension out there. So in order to get sales, you have to have sales. So it's important that you launch your product in a way that as soon as that product goes live, it gets conversions right away. And that can be through advertising, that can be through an email send that you already have, from an email list that you already have. It can be some combination of that. But you need to get some sales quite right away. So you really need to think through how you're going to launch your product. And once your product gets that conversion, we want to get you on page one for as many search terms or many keyword phrases as possible. So you really need to think about what keywords are people going to type in to find your product. And then looking at, you know, if somebody else is getting 30 sales a day on that keyword, you need to get 31 for, you know, maybe two weeks, that each day in order to kind of get that, you know, and getting hold that position. So we really want to approach it as I need to outsell my competitor, even for a short period of time. So I can get that top spot. And then it's up to my product quality. My you know, the packaging, the customer experience that I've created to hold that position.

 

Andy Splichal:

Well, this has been great and you know, shared a lot of great information with the listeners. Thank you.

 

Robyn Johnson:

No problem. My pleasure.

 

Andy Splichal:

Is there anything else you'd like to add before we wrap it up?

 

Robyn Johnson:

I actually just recently last launched another podcast called Process to Ecom Profits podcast with my friend Cindy Thomason who is a bookkeeper that specializes in Ecommerce. And so we just you know, we had somebody that was from Shark Tank. The that was just on last week. And this week is all about using logistics to increase your profitability specifically around Amazon. And he has some things that are on their front on Amazon. So you can also check out that podcast if you want to to learn more.

 

Andy Splichal:

Well, that's great. Well, thank you very much, Robin.

 

Robyn Johnson:

Thank you have a great day.

 

Andy Splichal:

Well that's it for today. Remember, if you liked this episode, please go to Apple podcasts and leave us an honest review. And if you're looking for more information connecting with Robin, you will find the links in the show notes below. In addition, if you're looking for more information on growing your business, check out our all new podcasts Resource Center available www.makeeachclickcount.com we have compiled all our different past guests by show topics include each of their contact information, in case you would like more information on any of the services I've discussed during previous episodes. In the meantime, remember to stay safe keep healthy and happy marketing and I will talk to you in the next episode.